Hurricane Marthew Vessel Salvage Report – Stocking Island, George Town, Bahamas

Hurricane Matthew Update, Stocking Island, George Town, Bahamas

Vessel salvage efforts in the hurricane holes on Stocking Island are proceeding rapidly.

Of the nine vessels that were driven into the rocks, only two (Vitamin Sea and Wind Minstrel) remain where they landed during the storm.

The Catamaran Ibis was pumped out and temporarily patched on the inside with braced plywood, then towed to a nearby beach and grounded at high tide so that repairs could be completed. Co-owners Dwayne (also from the vessel Boomdeyada) and Blair have been hard at work the last few days patching holes and drying the inside. She will likely be refloated within the next couple of days.

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The sailing vessel Sojourner was pulled from the rocks today, and with pumps running was towed to a different location for repairs.

Vitamin Sea was righted a few days ago and remains standing in place on her keel in the sand. She is sitting high enough that at all but high tide the damaged portions of her hull are exposed and most of the holes are now patched. The plan is to refloat her at the next high tide this afternoon.

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The vessel Wind Minstrel fared well in terms of damage. She came to rest against the mangroves and I’ve been told she is not holed. Her keel is well and truly buried in sand through, and she’s sitting quite high. I think it will take a dredge to get her floating again.

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The vessel Syrenia has some minor holes, but the owner Barry reports that the incoming water was easily handled by bilge pumps until the holes can be repaired.

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I’m told Last Rodeo came through with only cosmetic damage despite swing against the rocks. It appears that the cosmetic issues are already being addressed.

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All of the vessels that were holed suffered some water damage to one degree or another. I’m told that in a couple of the cases the internal damage, combined with the hull damage, may well result in the boat being scrapped. In several cases it will depend on the decisions of the insurance companies what the ultimate fate of the vessel will be.

See my other posts on Hurricane Matthew:

Preparing for our First Hurricane

Hurricane Matthew: Waiting for the Eye of the Storm

Watching from Afar as my Family Preps for a Hurricane (Byn’s perspective from the US)

Weathering Our First Real Storm

Broken Dreams and Happy Endings: The Aftermath of a Hurricane in Georgetown, Bahamas

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